Creating Useful Comments

A major problem with most applications today is that they lack useful comments. It’s impossible for anyone to truly understand how an application works unless the developer provides comments at the time the code is written. In fact, this issue extends to the developer. A month after someone writes an application, it’s possible to forget the important details about it. In fact, for some of us, the interval between writing and forgetting is even shorter. Writing good comments is a main topic in C# Design and Development as part of Chapter 13, but I make the topic part of every application development book I write. Despite my best efforts and those of many other authors, many online examples lack any comments whatsoever, making them nearly useless to anyone who lacks time to run the application through a debugger to discover how it works.

Good application code comments help developers of all stripes in a number of ways. As a minimum, the comments you provide as part of your application code provides these benefits.

 

  • Debugging: It’s easier to debug an application that has good comments because the comments help the person performing the debugging understand how the developer envisioned the application working.
  • Updating: Anyone who has tried to update an application that lacks comments knows the pain of trying to figure out the best way to do it. Often, an update introduces new bugs because the person performing the update doesn’t understand how to interact with the original code.
  • Documentation: Modern IDEs often provide a means of automatically generating application documentation based on the developer comments. Good comments significantly reduce the work required to create documentation and sometimes eliminate it altogether.
  • Technique Description: You get a brainstorm in the middle of the night and try it in your code the next day. It works! Comments help you preserve the brainstorm that you won’t get back later no matter how hard you try. The technique you use today could also solve problems in future applications, but the technique may become unavailable unless you document it.
  • Problem Resolution: Code often takes a circuitous route to accomplish a task because the direct path will result in failure. Unless you document your reasons for using a less direct route, an update could cause problems by removing the safeguards you’ve provided.
  • Performance Tuning: Good comments help anyone tuning the application understand where performance changes could end up causing the application to run more slowly or not at all. A lot of performance improvements end up hurting the user, the data, or the application because the person tuning the application didn’t have proper comments for making the adjustments.


I had previously mentioned the need for good comments. Some developers write comments that are nearly useless. Although it’s hard to encapsulate the substance of a good comment, developers who answer these sorts of questions are well on their way to writing good comments.

 

  • Who is affected by the code?
  • What is the code supposed to do?
  • When is the code supposed to perform this task?
  • Where does the code obtain resources needed to perform the task?
  • Why did the developer use a particular technique to write the code?
  • How does the code accomplish the task without causing problems with other applications or system resources?


There are many other questions you could ask yourself, but these six questions are a good start. You won’t answer every question for every last piece of code in the application because sometimes a question isn’t pertinent. As you work through your code and gain experience, start writing down questions you find yourself asking. Good answers to aggravating questions produce superior comments. Whenever you pull your hair out trying to figure out someone’s code, especially your own, remember that a comment could have saved you time, frustration, and effort. What is your take on comments? Let me know at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com.

 

Author: John

John Mueller is a freelance author and technical editor. He has writing in his blood, having produced 99 books and over 600 articles to date. The topics range from networking to artificial intelligence and from database management to heads-down programming. Some of his current books include a Web security book, discussions of how to manage big data using data science, a Windows command -line reference, and a book that shows how to build your own custom PC. His technical editing skills have helped over more than 67 authors refine the content of their manuscripts. John has provided technical editing services to both Data Based Advisor and Coast Compute magazines. He has also contributed articles to magazines such as Software Quality Connection, DevSource, InformIT, SQL Server Professional, Visual C++ Developer, Hard Core Visual Basic, asp.netPRO, Software Test and Performance, and Visual Basic Developer. Be sure to read John’s blog at http://blog.johnmuellerbooks.com/. When John isn’t working at the computer, you can find him outside in the garden, cutting wood, or generally enjoying nature. John also likes making wine and knitting. When not occupied with anything else, he makes glycerin soap and candles, which comes in handy for gift baskets. You can reach John on the Internet at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com. John is also setting up a website at http://www.johnmuellerbooks.com/. Feel free to take a look and make suggestions on how he can improve it.