An Update About Mono

I’m not one to get stuck on a particular form of a technologyit’s best to use the solution that works, rather than make a favored solution try to fit. Many .NET developers miss opportunities to move their solutions to other platforms or use them in places that normally don’t work well with the .NET Framework by leaving out Mono, the .NET Framework alternative. Most people associate Mono with the Macintosh or Linux, but there is also a Windows form of Mono. When Windows Server 2008 Server Core came out without the .NET Framework, I immediately wrote an article about it entitled, “Mixing Server Core with .NET Applications.” In fact, I’ve promoted Mono to frustrated administrators in my book, “Administering Windows Server 2008 Server Core.” Before Microsoft finally came out with a .NET Framework solution, you could use Mono to do things like run ASP.NET applications on Windows Server 2008 Server Core and my book told you how to do it in Chapter 24.

So, I was more than a little disturbed when I heard that the Mono crew had been laid off by Novell. Fortunately, I discovered later that the layoffs are just a prelude to having Mono supported by a new company named Xamarin. To read more about this company, check out Miguel de Icaza’s blog entry, “Announcing Xamarin.” Not only will the new company continue supporting the open source versions of both Mono and Moonlight (the Silverlight alternative), but it’ll create new commercial products for both Android and iOS. In short, this development is actually good because the new company will focus on this incredibly useful technology.

My main concern for the new company is that they won’t have the funding to do everything they envision doing, but that remains to be seen. Reading Mary Jo Foley’s article gives me hope that they’ll succeed. What are your thoughts about Mono? Is it a technology that you’ve used or at least are willing to try? Let me know at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com.

 

Author: John

John Mueller is a freelance author and technical editor. He has writing in his blood, having produced 99 books and over 600 articles to date. The topics range from networking to artificial intelligence and from database management to heads-down programming. Some of his current books include a Web security book, discussions of how to manage big data using data science, a Windows command -line reference, and a book that shows how to build your own custom PC. His technical editing skills have helped over more than 67 authors refine the content of their manuscripts. John has provided technical editing services to both Data Based Advisor and Coast Compute magazines. He has also contributed articles to magazines such as Software Quality Connection, DevSource, InformIT, SQL Server Professional, Visual C++ Developer, Hard Core Visual Basic, asp.netPRO, Software Test and Performance, and Visual Basic Developer. Be sure to read John’s blog at http://blog.johnmuellerbooks.com/. When John isn’t working at the computer, you can find him outside in the garden, cutting wood, or generally enjoying nature. John also likes making wine and knitting. When not occupied with anything else, he makes glycerin soap and candles, which comes in handy for gift baskets. You can reach John on the Internet at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com. John is also setting up a website at http://www.johnmuellerbooks.com/. Feel free to take a look and make suggestions on how he can improve it.