Getting the Right Visual Studio Add-In

Give me the right tool and I can use it to create just about anything in code! It’s a bold statement and I’m sure that I’d have little trouble finding a lot of other developers who believe precisely the same thing. Unfortunately, finding the right tool is akin to finding a needle in a haystack (feel free to substitute any other worn cliche you can think about). How does someone quantify the usability of a tool or decide whether to even download it in the first place. I recently wrote an article for Software Quality Connection entitled, “Techniques for Finding Useful IDE Add-ins” that answers that question. The article proposes some techniques you can use to make the process of finding just the right add-in easier.

Of course, my great add-on is a piece of junk for you. Our needs, goals, programming skills, and programming tasks differ. So, what I’d like to know is how you look for add-ins and how you use them to create better applications. It’s nice to get another perspective on a given topic. Over the years I’ve talked with hundreds (perhaps thousands) of readers about the tools they use because the right tool in the right hands can do amazing things. Most of my books contain a healthy number of links to various tools and I often employ add-ins in my books to make tasks easier. Let me know about your favorite add-in and tell me why you think it’s so great at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com. (Please, no vendor e-mails. I already know your tool is great; I really want to hear from people in the trenches on this topic.)

Part of my reason for asking this sort of information is to improve the quality of my books and articles. Quality is extremely important to me. In fact, it’s the reason I created the beta reader program. A beta reader reviews my manuscript as I write it. You can find out more about the beta reader program in my Errors in Writing post. If you want to become a beta reader, just write me at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com for additional details. In the meantime, try out some new add-ins and have a bit of fun .

Author: John

John Mueller is a freelance author and technical editor. He has writing in his blood, having produced 99 books and over 600 articles to date. The topics range from networking to artificial intelligence and from database management to heads-down programming. Some of his current books include a Web security book, discussions of how to manage big data using data science, a Windows command -line reference, and a book that shows how to build your own custom PC. His technical editing skills have helped over more than 67 authors refine the content of their manuscripts. John has provided technical editing services to both Data Based Advisor and Coast Compute magazines. He has also contributed articles to magazines such as Software Quality Connection, DevSource, InformIT, SQL Server Professional, Visual C++ Developer, Hard Core Visual Basic, asp.netPRO, Software Test and Performance, and Visual Basic Developer. Be sure to read John’s blog at http://blog.johnmuellerbooks.com/. When John isn’t working at the computer, you can find him outside in the garden, cutting wood, or generally enjoying nature. John also likes making wine and knitting. When not occupied with anything else, he makes glycerin soap and candles, which comes in handy for gift baskets. You can reach John on the Internet at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com. John is also setting up a website at http://www.johnmuellerbooks.com/. Feel free to take a look and make suggestions on how he can improve it.